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Teens murder man because they were ‘bored’

Teens murder man because they were ‘bored’

The Australian baseball player out for a jog in an Oklahoma neighborhood was shot and killed by three “bored” teenagers who decided to kill someone for fun, police said. Photo: Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Police say an Australian baseball player out for a jog in Oklahoma was shot and killed by three “bored” teenagers who decided to kill someone for fun.

Christopher Lane was visiting Duncan, where his girlfriend lives, and had passed a home where the boys were staying. Police Chief Danny Ford says that apparently led to him being gunned down at random.

The chief says a 17-year-old has confessed, but investigators haven’t found the weapon used in Friday’s shooting.

That teen, a 15-year-old and a 16-year-old remain in custody. Ford says the district attorney is expected to file first-degree murder charges Tuesday. It wasn’t known if they will be charged as adults or juveniles.

The 22-year-old Lane, of Melbourne, attended East Central University in Ada on a baseball scholarship.

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