News

Study: Youth attitudes shift in Great Recession

Study: Youth attitudes shift in Great Recession

A new analysis provides a look at ways high school seniors' attitudes shifted in the Great Recession. Photo: Associated Press/Mel Evans

CHICAGO (AP) — Some have wondered how the Great Recession might affect a generation of young people that’s been characterized, unfairly or not, as “entitled.”

Will this recession change them? Will the effect last?

A new analysis of a long-term survey provides a look at ways high school seniors’ attitudes shifted in the first years of this most recent recession.

Among the findings: young people showed signs of being more interested in conserving resources and a bit more concerned about their fellow human beings.

Compared with young people surveyed a few years before the recession, the Great Recession group also showed less interest in having vacation homes and new cars.

But they still placed more importance on those items than young people surveyed in the 1970s, an era with its own economic challenges.

Recent Headlines

in Local

Transportation Bill Moves Closer to Finalization

Road Construction

A major transportation funding bill will be up for final action next week in the South Dakota legislature.

in Local

Official Revenue Numbers on the Way for Legislature

money one hundred dollar bill

The next big step for South Dakota lawmakers will come next week when they get the official revenue numbers for the current fiscal year, and the latest estimates for the next year.

in Local

Bill Killed to Allow Cities to Raise Funds With Sales Tax

state capitol pierre

A bill that would have allowed cities in South Dakota to raise their sales tax for specific projects was in front of the House State Affairs committee today.

in Local

Napa Junction Development Still Possible

BNSF train 41714

The Yankton County Commission heard this week that development prospects at Napa Junction are not dead.

in Local

Pipeline Project Still Alive

Trans Canada sign 040814

Despite the failure of Congress this week to override the President’s veto of the Keystone XL bill, the project is not dead.