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South Dakota Gets Poor Grade On Emergency Care

South Dakota Gets Poor Grade On Emergency Care

Photo: clipart.com

A report from the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) gives South Dakota a grade of D plus for emergency care. The group says the state received three “D’s” and an “F” in five categories of care. The state got a “C plus” in the Medical Liability Environment.

The report is critical of the lack of emergency physicians and low level of funding for quality improvement of emergency medical services.

Dave Hewett, President and C.E.O. of the South Dakota Association of Healthcare Organizations, says the state doesn’t fit the ACEP model…

 

The report says only thirty six percent of the state’s population is within an hour of a level one or two trauma center. Hewett says level ones are very specialized…

 

Hewett says the state’s rural hospitals are very good at stabilizing and transporting emergency patients to larger hospitals.

Hewett says many public safety areas highlighted in the report have already been debated and rejected by the legislature…

 

ACEP recommends a state EMS medical director, increase the number of healthcare workers, improve traffic safety laws and improve disaster preparedness.

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