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Bosworth Decries Name Calling

Bosworth Decries Name Calling

Photo: WNAX

Standing in front of a hand painted “anarchy” symbol, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Annette Bosworth held an unorthodox news conference in a small, sweltering storefront in Sioux Falls and condemned what she says are profane comments about her.

 

In addition to the anarchy symbol, the Sioux Falls doctor stood in front of a couple offensive terms for women. She recited a list of current and past Republican and Democratic women politicians and candidates—including herself– who she says have endured nasty comments.

 

 

She also called the news conference setting—a small room with floor-to-ceiling hand painted posters with offensive language on them that she said her artists found online about her.

 

 

She also challenged reporters to Google the male candidates in the U.S. Senate race to see that they have not been referred to in similarly offensive terms.

 

Bosworth is one of five Republican candidates running for the U.S. Senate nomination next Tuesday in the South Dakota primary election.

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