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Syrup spill leaves commuters in sticky spot

Syrup spill leaves commuters in sticky spot

WAFFLES, ANYONE?: The tanker, which was hauling 48,000 gallons of syrup to an Oklahoma City restaurant, traveled for miles before the driver noticed the syrup leak. Photo: clipart.com

OKLAHOMA CITY (Reuters) – Traffic slowed to a trickle on a major Oklahoma City highway on Wednesday morning after a tractor trailer hauling syrup sprang a leak and left a 5-mile trail of the sticky substance on the roadway.

“We called an environmental clean-up company to determine how to clean up the mess,” said Cole Hackett, a spokesman for the Oklahoma Department of Transportation.

The department closed off some lanes of Interstate 44, placing salt and sand over the pancake syrup spill.

The tanker, which was hauling 48,000 gallons of syrup to an Oklahoma City restaurant, traveled for miles before the driver noticed the syrup leak, the department said.

Some commuters in Oklahoma City had a sense of humor about the mess.

“I got caught in the syrup spill this morning,” said Oklahoma City resident Jon Fisher, “and now I’m craving pancakes.”

(Reporting by Heide Brandes in Oklahoma City; Writing by Jon Herskovitz; Editing by Scott Malone)

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