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Michigan: school president wasn’t drinking before halftime speech

Michigan: school president wasn’t drinking before halftime speech

SPEECH PROBLEMS: Mary Sue Coleman, seen here during a 2010 press conference, gave an awkward speech during Saturday's football game. Photo: Associated Press

LARRY LAGE, AP Sports Writer

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — The University of Michigan has issued a statement saying school President Mary Sue Coleman had not been drinking alcohol before making remarks at halftime of the football game against Nebraska.

University spokesman Rick Fitzgerald said in a statement Monday morning that the awkward audio was a result of Coleman attempting to slow down her speech because of the significant feedback she was hearing from Michigan Stadium’s public-address system.

Coleman was honored at halftime of Saturday’s game because she is planning to retire in July.

The spokesman says Coleman didn’t have experience using the wireless microphone provided to her and significant wind led to the sound being distorted, delayed and reverberated.

Fitzgerald says Coleman attended non-alcoholic events before the game and hosted one during the game.

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