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Dell tries to solve ‘stinky’ laptop problem

Dell tries to solve ‘stinky’ laptop problem

THIS LAPTOP STINKS: Some Dell owners say their devices smell like a litter box. Photo: Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Ewwwww — you got a Dell. Some owners of Dell laptops say their computers stink. Not because they’re slow or don’t download fast enough — but that they really smell.

They say the Latitude 6430u laptops reek of cat urine — and that the kitty-like funk seems to come from the keyboard or palm rest.

Dell has heard the caterwauling — and has been trying to do something about it.

They had said owners of the Latitude 6430u’s — and no the “u” doesn’t stand for urine — should clean the keyboards with a soft cloth or compressed air. But the smell persisted.

One customer wrote Dell to say he kept scolding his cat because he thought it was using the keyboard as a litter box. Now Dell says the smell is traced to a manufacturing process, which the company has since fixed.

Dell is asking those who have the funky laptops to contact its tech support line to have the palm rest assembly replaced.

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