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Pipestone Systems CEO Weighs In On Animal Rights Group Investigation

The CEO of Pipestone Systems Dr. Luke Minion says the credibility of Mercy for Animals is in question.  That’s after hearing an interview on WNAX conducted with officials of the organization where they admitted they hired an undercover investigator to pose as a Pipestone Systems employee to obtain video with a hidden camera.  Minion says this brings into question the video of alleged animal abuse released to the public.

Minion explains some of the images in the Mercy for Animals video such as an employee hitting baby pigs on the concrete to euthanize them.  He says it’s not the same thing as putting a dog to sleep.

The veterinarian also explains the reason baby pigs are castrated or have their tails docked without pain killers.

Minion says they, along with the rest of the pork industry, continue to work to reassure consumers across the country that they’re producing pork in a humane manner.

He says this is a marketing and perception problem for the swine industry.

He says not responding to the attacks from animal activists will not make the issue go away.

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