Local

Judge Misses Alternative Courts

Photo: clipart.com

Judge Misses Alternative Courts

A judge on the Iowa Court of Appeals is lamenting the demise of three of the state’s specialty courts which have kept the drug-addicted and the mentally ill from repeatedly returning to prison. Judge Tom Bower was an assistant prosecutor in Black Hawk County when he helped start a drug court for non-violent offenders.

The state has about a dozen “specialty” courts, including a new court just for domestic violence cases, but due to a reduction in federal grant money two of the state’s drug and mental health courts closed June 30th.¬†Unlike the state’s crowded criminal courts, Bower says judges in these specialty courts are able to call offenders back into court within 24 hours of a probation violation.

Judges who preside in these specialty courts for drug addicts and the mentally ill initially sentence people to intensive treatment and supervision rather than time sitting in a prison cell. Bower and other advocates are pressing legislators to provide more state funding to replace lost federal dollars.

Recent Headlines

in National

U.S. courts deliver conflicting rulings on Obamacare

obamacare

A U.S. appeals court threw out a federal regulation that implements key subsidies that are vital to the health care overhaul.

in National

Armed bandits steal $181K from Atlantic City casino

casino

A manhunt is underway for masked robbers who stole $181,000 from Caesar's Atlantic City casino in New Jersey.

in National, World

Airlines halt flights to Israel

plane

Delta, American, and United have halted flights to Israel to ensure passenger safety as the turmoil in the region is intensifying.

in Local

University Partnership With Software Company Working

computer

University of South Dakota computer science students continue to benefit from a partnership with Eagle Creek Software in Vermillion.

in National

Judge dismisses Republican lawsuit over Obamacare

obamacare

A federal judge has thrown out a U.S. Senator's legal challenge to a part of the law that grants insurance subsidies for members of Congress.