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ISU Pathologist Says SDS Threat With Saturated Soils

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ISU Pathologist Says SDS Threat With Saturated Soils

The cool and rainy spring has put many soybean growers on the alert for Sudden Death Syndrome. The destructive soybean fungus thrives in cold and wet soil.

Iowa State University Plant Pathologist Dr. Leonor Leandro says some S-D-S has shown up but how severe it gets depends on the weather through the growing season.

Leandro says there are some soybean varieties that have some resistance to S-D-S. She says those who have to replant should consider planting those varieties.

S-D-S invades the roots of the soybean plant and when the soil is wet, releases toxins that produce yellowing and wilting leaves. Plants can experience anything from smaller or reduced seeds to total pod loss.

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