Local

Cuts Could Impact Those On Dialysis

Photo: clipart.com

Cuts Could Impact Those On Dialysis

Among the scores of programs facing federal budget cuts under sequestration, Medicare and Medicaid will see a funding loss of more than nine-percent for the care of dialysis patients. Jack Reynolds, a central Iowa native and vice president of the non-profit group Dialysis Patient Citizens, says more than 23-hundred Iowans need dialysis three times a week to stay alive.

One in seven Americans has kidney disease. Diabetes and high blood pressure are the two top causes of kidney failure, and with diabetes at “epidemic” proportions in the U-S, Reynolds says this course of action by Congress is foolhardy.

Reynolds is a 61-year-old Carlisle native and has been on dialysis thrice weekly for 39 years — since his kidneys failed when he was 22. The cuts in Medicare and Medicaid payments are scheduled for January and may force dialysis clinics to cut back hours, cut staff, or in a worst case, close, which Reynolds says would cause a ripple effect of problems for dialysis patients.

Recent Headlines

in Agriculture

NRDC Opposes Enlist Duo Approval

Fresh
soybeans 1

The Natural Resources Defense Council has filed a lawsuit to reverse EPA’s approval of Enlist Duo Herbicide. NRDC Senior scientist…

in Agriculture

Senator Wants Review of Possible Rail Merger

Fresh
Railroad Tracks

Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar is asking federal officials to review a possible rail merger between the Canadian Pacific and CSX…

in Local

Radon Testing Encouraged

Fresh
radon

This week is National Radon Action Week, and the Cancer Prevention Center is encouraging radon testing to reduce the number of Americans exposed to the gas.

in Local

Loan Guarantees For Electric Companies

Fresh
electric poles

The US Department of Agriculture has announced over one point four billion dollars in loan guarantees to rural electric cooperatives across the country.

in Local

Healthcare Faces Challenges

Fresh
Medical Stethoscope

The new President of Avera Sacred Heart Hospital in Yankton says healthcare in general will face many challenges in the next few years.