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Congressman Steve King Defending Comments

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Congressman Steve King Defending Comments

 Iowa Republican Congressman Steve King is defending comments he made last week that sparked controversy and were denounced  by the top two Republicans in the House. King’s remarks were about so-called DREAMers — people under the age of 35 who were brought into the U.S. illegally by their parents when they were children. King opposes efforts to grant the group legal resident status.

During a House hearing on Tuesday a Democratic congressman from Florida called King’s remarks “inflammatory” and “offensive.

King says DREAM Act supporters are trying to tug at the “heartstrings” by focusing on the plight of DREAMers who’ve been good students.

King is a leading voice in opposition to any House action on immigration, including the bill House G-O-P leaders say is in the works, something dubbed the “Kids Act” that would to grant some sort of legal status to those who were brought into the U.S. illegally when they were children.

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